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Saturday, July 14, 2012

ITALIAN HORROR WEEK: The Rebirth of the Italian Horror Empire (Part II of III)

PART 2
Featuring Edo Tagliavini, Roberto Del Piccolo and Ivan Zuccon




Welcome to the second installment of our three part series on the independent directors of Italy that are working to save horror cinema one film at a time. Please see our previous entry in the series to enjoy the work of our previously featured artists. Today we focus on three more directors that have made some terrifying pictures. Feel free to leave comments about the film, the new Italian Horror movement as well as any questions you might have for the directors. They might be following along with you. On to our first director...




EDO TAGLIAVINI 



Edo Tagliavini has given Italian horror fans something to enjoy. When asked what genre I would file Bloodline under that is simple, horror. When you ask me what subgenre I think it fits under pause and without give anything away I say this is in the same subgenre as Last House in the Woods… so whatever that is. Bloodline (2011) is a film that transcends the genre barrier to induce a feeling of chaos; madness. It’s ability to take on everything from giallo to mad scientist, possession to zombie and then bring the whole soup together with a hint of torture porn is astounding.



Synopsis from Opencinema:

Sandra and her colleague Marco are sent by their boss to a hardcore movie set in order to shoot a backstage: everything would appear to be everyday journalistic routine, if the shooting location didn’t happen to be the same where, fifteen years before, Sandra’s little sister was murdered by a serial killer called “The Surgeon”. Reluctant at first, Sandra will eventually face her fears by accepting the job only to find herself involved in a new line of murders: who’s the Surgeon copycat? And more important, why are his victims coming back to life only to kill again?


From that synopsis I’m sure you can see the cross genre potential. It goes beyond what you read here and twists and turns its way through the film ultimately finishing off with a mysterious conclusion.

While watching Bloodline I was deeply impressed with both the music and the special effects. There is absolutely a reason for this. Does the name Sergio Stivaletti mean anything to you? Yeah, you know… the special effects master from Italy? His work is beautifully showcased here with the kind of gross out that you’ve come to expect from this talented man. On the music composition side we have none other than Claudio Simonetti… yes, that Simonetti. You’ll love the music selections. Impeccable cast and crew.



Bloodline is an aggressive, intense ride through your favorite urban legend and your worst nightmare. The look of The Surgeon is fantastic and hints to some of the better gialli of the 1980’s; think of your favorite Italian motorcycle helmet wearing villains and then add grit. We should expect good things from Tagliavini in the future and wish him well.

Who do you consider your influences within the world of Italian Horror? Who do you consider internationally?

It’s funny because I grew up with Raimi and Peter Jackson: when I was teenager. I remember the fun with the splatter but the best was Lost Boys in that time but when I really started to try to be a movie director, my influence came not from the “Horror world”. The master Herzog is the director who showed me the first way to be a director, to be a man! J

I mean, I like the approach at the life of Herzog, and than accordingly, the approach to the making a movie.

So, no influence from Italian Horror world: but I remember perfectly the two best Italian movies from my childhood: “Demoni” by Bava, and Phenomena by Argento.

Did you watch horror growing up? What movies influenced you and were they from Italy?

Of course, I remember my first VCS recorder: every night I was with my brother to check out some horror movies… you know, you go inside a video shop and it’s not important the movie, because you are young and you don’t know the director… the cover of the DVD dictated the selection of the movie night… so, we watched some big shit movie, just for a good image in the cover. J

The scariest movie I ever saw was Amityville Horror of 1979, when the blood come out from the wall… in that time (I was 8 years hold) I slept with my back against the wall, so for two months I was scared to sleep in that way!

But, and please do not laugh at me J, it was John Landis and Michael Jackson with “Thriller” that made me fall in love with Horror style but in ironic way!

What is your favorite aspect of the horror genre? What is your favorite subgenre?

I think the political aspect of horror is what I like in that stuff! Unfortunately in my Bloodline there is nothing of this, so I try to put inside the subgenre: the irony… also because I would like more to make a comedy for my first feature movie rather than a horror ;)
I joke, but true, I love to make people laugh!

This does not mean that “Bloodline” only makes people laugh J!

What will be the next project you will be working on?

I just finished my episode for “Project of Evil”, the second collective movie about Poe… I chose “Breathless” and I shot with Francesco Malcom (already actor from Bloodline) a ironic version of the Poe’s tale. I am very satisfied because I put in everything  that people had criticized in Bloodline, and I was very indie punk, but I think that is my style J

I am also in writing two comedies and a new thriller movie, but we are in the very beginning.

Bloodline has many different subgenres wrapped up into one package. Ghosts, possession, homicidal maniacs, mad scientists. Was it difficult to balance the various themes?

The original script and the first screenplay of Bloodline was not mine. The production called me already half way through pre-production… they said because the producer was too busy to also direct… I am treacherous and I think they have called me because the story is very difficult . If the movie bad at least I was guilty. J I joke, off course (but there is a little truth in it).

I wrote the script ten times before the producer gave me the “ok”, than, because it was in pre production it was disaster. The director of photography was changed two days before start the shooting, so I worked every morning during the breakfast with the new DoP in thinking the faster and easy way for shoot. The set was a  jungle, the movie was building day by day, like shooting a different story every time, but to make the whole movie.

I think the secret was break the brakes of the machine, and follow the descent of the car like a rollercoaster, preferring to entertain with many inventions,  rather than to follow a linear story… if everything  was senseless, in Bloodline everything would come full circle J

Bloodline begins feeling like a slasher film or gialli. Were their movies that you would say influenced the decision to shoot the film in this way?

It’s funny because I think when I shoot something, I don’t try to imitate some movie, also if it’s not my intention be superior and  try to make something totally new!

I just shoot, and I think it is natural you grow with  your creation.  Your formation is part of you, and it’s compenetrate with your art.

So, I just felt it to be the best for those opening scenes, and I shot in that way…

I feel like Last House in the Woods by Albanesi and Bloodline could be sister films… related. Did Last house in the Woods influence Bloodline?

I watched the movie of Gabriele after many people talked to me in a bad way. I feel funny about the movie, but it was my thinking to try to make a different style, try to make a more “professional” look in my movie, and maybe put inside less blood but try to make something who also people don’t like horror can watch.

I think, for my taste, the movie of Gabriele is too close to being just for the horror fans, and also his irony in its focus at that kind of person…

So, no, Last House in the Woods, didn’t have influence to me

Who do you consider your contemporaries in Italy? Who’s making the best horror right now?

We have to talk about this in two different ways in Italy: the “indie” and the “main stream”.
Inside the first “category” I am happy because many movies are in production, and all with different style and taste: so I very like Domiziano Cristofaro, Gionata Zarantonello, Perrone Rosi e Ristori, Albanesi, Giacomelli, Bianchini… and lot of other directors, also because in that moment we are all different surfers inside one wave!

Eheheheh, sometimes I am so politically correct J

The main stream I very like Salvatores.
The best Horror in Italy? I didn’t see the new movie of Zarantonello, but I think He is the winner.

Which Italian horror movie would you love to have worked on? Is there any that you would like to remake or see remade?

Maybe it would have been nice to work on “Demoni”. So technically good for that time. The FX of Stivaletti… I like lattice and animatronic… John Carpenter’s The Thing. It’s one of my favorite movies (Carpenter IS one of my favorite horror director)…and I haven’t forgotten Pupi Avati with his “Zeder” and “La Casa dalle Finestre che ridono”. (I think that’s the “The House with the Laughing Windows”, but I am not sure)

But now, in thinking in a deep way, I would like to have worked on some Petri movies, who made so different genres, also some horror, but all in a very visionary way, without a drop of blood but sooo amazing!

What’s your favorite horror movie soundtrack?

Easy, Carpenter J with his bass.

But if we talk about the total score music, I super like “Return of the Living Dead” with its punk soundtrack (The Cramps are my favourite band), and I also super like “Cry Little Sister” from Lost Boys.

For the Italian films the Phenomena soundtrack is very good, and when I worked with Simonetti for the Bloodline soundtrack, I asked to him to try to make some sounds (in second part of the movie) with sound like “Maggot” song.

NOTE: Edo Tagliavini has a new project in the works that should be making the rounds shortly. While it hasn’t been released to the world as of yet the title is P.O.E 2 Project of Evil. If you like A Serbian Film you are going to love this. Brutal, gory and shot with Tagliavini’s unique style that will shock you till you drop. Don’t miss it!


IVAN ZUCCON 

COLOUR FROM THE DARK

















Colour from the Dark is the most recent feature film from Ivan Zuccon (excluding his upcoming release) and it is clear to see that Zuccon has developed a style that shocks and startles without the use of taboo bending or breaking all the social mores in the book. Colour from the Dark is a just that.. DARK. The horror hides in the shadows and in some outstanding special effects that, while they are not overly complex, they get the point across. BOO! Colour from the Dark is another H.P. Lovecraft adaptation and to date the most effective of his endeavors into Lovecraft’s work.


Synopsis (from Ivan Zuccon):

Pietro and Lucia live on an isolated farm with Alice, Lucia's younger sister. Poor farmers, they live tilling the soil. Pietro is a good worker and a strong man who, unlike his three brothers, is not at war because of a deformed knee. Lucia is a beautiful and reserved woman dedicated to her family. Their life is peaceful and good, in spite of the hard work. One day, while drawing water from the well, Pietro and Alice accidentally free something from Earth's womb. A strange and alien color flashes underwater, at the well's bottom, then disappears. From that moment on, inexplicable events start happening all around the farm, and by night the surrounding vegetation glitters with a sinister glow. The color soon takes hold of the whole farm, and dwelling inside Pietro and his family's minds, it brings them into its sick world of pain, blood and death. 


Debbie Rochon heads up a cast of pretty damn good acting talent. I’m glad to see this scream queen… scream empress really is helping to bring back the Italian cinema into the spotlight especially in the United States where we need Hollywood to take notice of some truly creepy worky.  Zuccon works well with his core group of actors and actresses and it shows. You know what doesn’t show? The budget. This film is economical and takes advantage of the cast, special effects crew and talent of the director but not at the expense of a large budget.

I urge you to enjoy this film. Cover the well at all costs and let Debbie Rochon and Ivan Zuccon know you’re paying attention and you like what you see.

NYMPHA

Nympha is a sexually charged story of that has religious overtones while dealing with questions of religion, what a cult might be and how your world view can change at the drop of a dime. It’s really the story of change; How your conception might change when faced with a different option for a religious icon. It draws its influence from the religious horror films of the 70’s; shocking at times, haunting at others and yet others it is brutal. 

Synopsis (from the film’s website):

NyMpha is the story of Sarah, a young English girl, who goes to Italy to take vows needed to become a cloister nun of the "New Order" Convent. The rules of the convent are very strict, so strict that they are often considered a form of torture. Sarah's path is divided into four steps, "hear" the Lord, "see" the Lord, "touch" the Lord and "talk" with the Lord…

Each step will be painful for both Sarah's physical and mental self. Moreover, during Sarah's journey, she often has visions of the Convents past, visions that it was the house of a young girl named Ninfa...

Ninfa's life was ruined by the religious fanaticism of her violent grandfather Geremia, who believes that he can talk directly with God. In reality, he is utterly mad, and this madness seems to be present today (within the walls of the convent) where young Sarah lives…


This is a movie that draws on the power of ever changing religious belief tied with the charged sexual nature and metaphor that is often associated with well organized religion. Nympha deals with an assortment of controversial subjects and apologizes for none of them. By the end of the movie I found myself referencing The Exorcist and even Ken Russel’s the Devils for influence points. You might even look into Alucarda or Don’t Deliver Us from Evil (although that might be admittedly a stretch). There is no innocence. Nympha takes your virginity if you are fortunate enough to have it after all this time.  This award winning, festival tested feature is a good introduction to how Ivan Zuccon can terrify you.




THE SHUNNED HOUSE

The Shunned House is an H.P. Lovecraft adaptation that attempts to follow three separate people through three separate stories in a near portmanteau, anthology. While the imagery is dark, foreboding and the titular house is clearly meant to creep out the overall story is a chaotic look at the life of a house and not simply a look at the human story.

Synopsis (from IMDB):

Based on H.P. Lovecraft's tale, "The Shunned House," presents the stories of three people who all died within the confines of the dark and isolated chateau. Each story is taken from a different period in time, yet they combine with one another to reveal the house's dark past to a journalist specializing in the paranormal and his skeptic girlfriend.

One of the things that has always been apparent since image hit celluloid that the works of Howard Phillips Lovecraft are incredibly difficult to adapt. I am fond of the imagery, the ghost story vibe, and you might as well call me a Salem’s Lot junkie because I kept hearing James Mason’s voice thinking about that damn evil house. While I would say that Zuccon’s production suffers from some of the same difficulties that most Lovecraft adaptations suffer from, the overwhelming atmosphere of mystery, dark imaginative and unknown evils are preserved. If you take each sequence in and of itself and pull away the fact that it’s a literary adaptation you have a chaotic piece of terror cinema not unlike the styling of Lucio Fulci in the Beyond (although somewhat less gory).


Here’s an interview with Ivan Zuccon whose latest work to be released in February of 2013, Wrath of Crows, will also star Debbie Rochon.


Who do you consider your influences within the world of Italian Horror? Who do you consider internationally?

When I was a kid I was fascinated by cinema. I really loved Sergio Leone's westerns. I remember planning to shoot a sci-fi western, and starting to write an outline. The real passion however, came years later when I got acquainted with the horror genre. I had always been scared to death of horror movies, but one day I decided to face my fears and watch the movies of the horror masters. I rented ten movies and closed myself in a room, alone with my VCR. I was impressed by Mario Bava, Lucio Fulci, Sam Raimi and John Carpenter. I was mostly interested in the technical side of Raimi's films and the visionary approach of Bava's work. I decided I would make horror movies, because they would allow me to use more creative shooting techniques. I fished out my father's old super-8 camera and shot some very short movies, which I edited myself. It was fun, and very gratifying. Since then I've never stopped thinking about and making films.

Did you watch horror growing up? What movies influenced you and were they from Italy?

Of course, once faced my fear I’ve started watching any kind of horror movie. The movie that influenced me mostly was John Carpenter’s Escape From New York. I was a teen when I saw it and I remember it as a great visual and atmospheric experience. The work that Carpenter did with the characters was amazing and despite it wasn’t a pure horror, it was scary, probably due the atmosphere the movie was shrouded.

What is your favorite aspect of the horror genre? What is your favorite subgenre?

The horror genre is very important to me. I don’t think that it’s a marginal one. Horror films can dig on a several psychological aspect of the human being and can help us to face our fears. From this point of view we can say that horror movies made a cathartic function.

I love all the subgenres except the only-splatters movies and the so called “torture porn”.

If by ‘modern’ horror we mean those hyper-violent action movies with just few true horror elements, like the Saw saga for example, then I really don't like them.

What will be the next project you will be working on?

Actually I’m working on a movie called “Wrath of the crows”. We are in post-production and the movie will be ready by the end of the year. The next project? Honestly I don't know right now. I have a couple of scripts I would like to realize but still nothing in the immediate future. I think I will start working on a new film in 2013. Also, I'm busy as hell right now working as an editor for the italian master Pupi Avati.

Both Nympha and Shunned House are atmospheric thrillers or ghost stories. The take their time to scare you. In your opinion, what is the best way to build tension in a film?

Let’s say I try and juxtapose the two main elements which stir the human beings actions: instinct and mind. Actually I’m not attracted by the beasty behaviours of men, quite the contrary they scare me. But of course when you want to tell fearful stories it is natural to tell what really scares you, and that’s why you can find such primary elements in my movies. In Colour From the Dark for example, the “mind” is well represented by Pietro, with his moral stiffness, his stubborness in trying to find a logical reason to all the evil suddenly bewildering his family. While Lucia embodies the wildest instincts,the reason getting overwhelmed by the most violent and grimmest drives. At the very end the reason will be squeezed by the evil driving everybody, degrading and corrupting everything.

Nympha is a deeply sexual story but also contains elements of a cult or religious sect. Do horror pictures have to be sexy to be scary? Does including a cult or religious sect make the film more realistic?

I don’t know if the religious aspect make the movie more realistic, but for sure it makes it very scary. I’ve always been obsessed by Catholic symbolism, and here in Italy we are surrounded by them. Some icons or statues of saints are so weird that often inspire me with ideas for a new movie and this is what happened with NyMpha. Looking to some paintings with religious themes you can see how violent was the Catholic Church in the past and how many obscure and horrific can be a film with the same subject.

The sexual aspect in the movie is present for a simple reason, it’s a taboo, especially in a movie with a strong religious theme, so this make the movie more scabrous, and this is important to make the movie more marketable also.


The Shunned House is an H.P. Lovecraft adaptation. What challenges did you face in adapting this work from the early 20th century?

Lovecraft created chaotic worlds that scare all of us. Day by day the real world is becoming more similar to the scary and chaotic worlds of HPL. For this reason his work is even more immediate and appealing to cinema audiences.

I love Lovecraft. But rather then his stories I'm much more interested in the man. I'd like to make a film telling his biography as the real story it was. His literature comes by him feeling like a "stranger", an "alien" to this world. Something I share with him. My interest in HPL comes from this feeling, not much by the terrible creeping creatures but by what they really meant for him. Often I get more exited by how one story was conceived than by the story itself. And I appreciate his terrible effort trying to describe what cannot be described.

Color from the Dark is an eerie film. What influenced the look and feel of this movie?

Well the feel was influenced by the original tale by H.P. Lovecraft. The problem when you adapt a writer’s work you admire is that you don’t want to betray him. I can say that I have never felt I've betrayed Lovecraft. Never. I have the maximum respect for him and his work and I think I have always respected him with my adaptations. Of course in adapting The Colour Out of Space I have changed some points of the story - I was forced to do this in order to fit it for the screen, but the atmosphere I've created is very close to what he wrote. When adapting Colour I didn’t just focus on the facts, or only on the characters, but also on the mood of the tale. From this point of view I would say my adaptation could be considered very close to Lovecraft’s idea.

Talking about the look I must admit my first inspiration was the work that Mario Bava did with the color in the ’60. If you look at those movies you can see how the color was important as a storytelling tool. I tried to do the same with my film. I’ve used the color to tell the story in the right way. The film start with a vivid cinematography, full of the colors of the nature. Then, after the evil originated by the well starts eating everything and sucks energy from any living creature, the colors become flat. I consider the whole movie just like a fade to black. The last shot in fact is black and white and very very dark.

Who do you consider your contemporaries in Italy? Who’s making the best horror right now?

Actually there’s not a “best Italian” director here. Our cinema is facing a deep crisis and for the Italian horror is also the worst. There are plenty of new directors that are emerging, but all of them are “indie”, just like me. Often we work with very small budgets and we fight against the stupid bureaucracy, and this makes things more difficult for us.

I personally was forced to shoot my movies directly in English because of this situation. This makes the movie more internationally marketable and I’ve seen that many of my colleagues are doing the same. So Italy is no more our main market for us. The directors of the Italian new wave I admire are Domiziano Cristopharo, Luigi Pastore, Marco Ristori e Luca Boni, jus to name a few.

Which Italian horror movie would you love to have worked on? Is there any that you would like to remake or see remade?

There’s a lot of great Italian movie I would love to be involved in some ways but the one that I really like and I would love to make a remake myself is Lucio Fulci’s The Beyond.

There are a lot of reason for that, but the first one was that this movie has the most exciting and enigmatic ending of the whole Italian cinematographic production. The other reasons is that there’s a minor H.P. Lovecraft influence and that the Fulci direction is so visual that often the dialogue are useless, just like a mute movie. This is pure cinema!

What’s your favorite horror movie soundtrack?

One of the most incredible soundtrack I’ve ever heard is Crash. The film, as all of us know is directed by David Cronenberg and the score is by Howard Shore. This music is so hypnotic that do a magnificent job and is perfecting in sync with the mood decided by the director. We can’t define this film as an horror, but there are some weird elements that put this movie at the top of my top10 list.
I love David Cronenberg a lot. He was my hero. I think he made more than just one film you could consider a masterpiece. Unfortunately I don't like his last two movies, they are standard thrillers and are so distant from the genial works he created in the past. His last film I really loved was Spider, a true masterpiece. I still admire him a lot. He has his reasons for his most recent films, but these choices don't fit my taste anymore.



ROBERTO DEL PICCOLO 

The Hounds starts off as a drive to the woods, and as horror fans, we know exactly what happens when the unsuspecting “good guys” of the world go into the woods. They get themselves completely dissolved into unparalleled terror the likes of which their brains can hardly imagine and will most likely not survive without being smooshed out their very ears.  The Hounds, starts slow. It doesn’t crush your horror loving head all at once, but let’s the tension build until finally the film becomes a brutal gore show.



Synopsis from The Hounds website:

One step away from a reconciliation with his wife, after a terrible tragedy has left his life in shatters, Mike Crowel, a CID agent, is assigned to a sinister case involving four young friends, Sarah, Jake, Martin and Dave. They soon become the unwitting focus of the evil forces and chillingly supernatural events surrounding Mike’s investigation. Their ultimate survival depends on Mike’s willpower and intuition, forcing him to confront the deadly shadows of his past.



While the overall tone is chaotic and the mysterious force behind the carnage is well hidden that doesn’t stop it from coming together to form a nice supernatural mystery complete with the its own Nancy Drew detective work that pretty much goes the way of “the eyeball” (those of you who have seen the movie know what I’m talking about). It’s not the Cabin in the Woods. It’s not YellowBrickRoad and it’s not Evil Dead. This one goes into the woods to stay in the woods, dead buried and with a few tree roots of pure evil along the way.



Written and Directed by Maurizio Del Piccolo and Roberto Del Piccolo.

The Hounds is available for purchase 2.99 GBP.  Please check out the website for the movieHERE and make sure to cough up a few bucks to enjoy this piece of Italian horror shot in Britain. 


Who do you consider your influences within the world of Italian Horror? 

MARIO BAVA

Who do you consider internationally? 

I LIKE ALEXANDRE AJA.

Did you watch horror growing up?

I FOLLOWED HORROR GAINING POPULARITY DURING THE YEARS. AS I AM NOT THAT YOUNG ANYMORE I CLEARLY REMEMBER THE MIGHTY 80S WITH CARPENTER,HOOPER,WES CRAVEN,ROMERO AND ALL THE OTHERS.THEY PROVIDED EXCELLENT FILMS, THOSE WERE THE “GOLDEN” YEARS

What movies influenced you and were they from Italy? 

THE FILM WHICH INFUENCED ME THE MOST IS “ EVIL DEAD” FROM RAIMI. IT CHANGED MY LIFE IT INSPIRED ME TO MAKE A FILM. ALTHOUGH IT IS NOT FROM ITALY I SEE A LOT OF BAVA`S INFLUENCE ON RAIMI`S WORK

What is your favorite aspect of the horror genre? 

I LIKE THE TENSION OF THE HORROR GENRE.I DONT LIKE IT WHEN ACTION IS MIXED WITH HORROR EVEN IF I THINK THAT THIS IS THE DIRECTION THAT HORROR IS GOING IN. MAYBE THE NEW GENERATION OF HORROR FANS APPRECIATE THIS KIND OF HORROR-ACTION MOVIE.

What is your favorite subgenre?

 I LIKE THE SPLATTER GORE GENRE, MAINLY INDEPENDANT. THERE ARE SO MANY TALENTED DIRECTORS OUT THERE THAT JUST AMAZE ME ALL THE TIME!

What will be the next project you will be working on? 

IT WOULD BE NASTIER THAN THE HOUNDS!A KIND OF A “HOSTEL” GENRE, BUT FAR FROM IT IN TERMS OF PLOT.WE ARE AIMING TOWARDS A TIGHT SCRIPT AND LOTS OF TENSION TO ENTERTAIN THE AUDIENCE

The Hounds has some absolutely gory effects. How were these effects designed through your company, Moviedel? Did you have your own hand in the effects design as well?

YES, WE DID EVERYTHING OURSELVES AS MOVIEDEL IS MY COMPANY.WE DESIGNED SOME “MACHINES” TO SHOOT SOME SCENES AND WE MIXED THE FX DIGITAL AND MECHANICAL

How does the creative/filmmaking process differ being able to work with Maurizio on projects and, on this film, sharing the writing and directing credits? 

WE SHARE IDEAS ALL THE TIME AND WE WORK TOGETHER CORRECTING THE PLOT WHENEVER IT IS REQUIRED TILL WE ARE BOTH SATISFIED. SO IT COMES OUT AS A MOVIE EFFECTIVELY DONE 50/50.WE ALSO ASK OPINIONS TO OUR DOP TOMMASO BORGSTROM WHO HAS GREAT EXPERIENCE AND IS INVOLVED IN OUR PROJECTS.

What movies influenced the production of The Hounds? Are there any “cabin in the woods” movies you drew from for inspiration? Did Evil Dead ever come up during the writing process? 

WELL,AS I SAID BEFORE THE “EVIL DEAD” INSPIRED US, BUT WE PUT A LOT OF OUR IMAGINATION IN IT AS THE PLOT IS UNUSUAL COMPARED TO MANY MOVIES SEEN SO FAR.

Who do you consider your contemporaries in Italy? Who’s making the best horror right now?

 I THINK THAT ALBANESI, RISTORI AND PICCHIO ARE ALL ON THE SAME LEVEL, SO IS ZAMPAGLIONE, BUT HE WORKS WITH HIGHER BUDGETS, SO IT IS EASIER FOR HIM. ITALIANS ARE FINALLY MAKING A COME BACK, WE JUST NEED A LITTLE MORE INVESTMENT  AS ITALY HAS THE TALENT, WE NEED PEOPLE WHO TRUST IN OUR ABILITY.

Which Italian horror movie would you love to have worked on? Is there any that you would like to remake or see remade? 

YES, I LOVE ALL OF MARIO BAVA`S FILM. I`D LOVE TO DO A RE-MAKE OF “RABID DOG” ALTHOUGH IT IS NOT A HORROR BUT A KIND OF SPAGHETTI “PULP FICTION” SHOT MANY YEARS BEFORE TARANTINO.

What’s your favorite horror movie soundtrack?

 MY FAVOURITE HORROR SOUND TRACK IS CALLED “THE HOUNDS”;).JOKING ASIDE, I WORKED WITH PIERLUIGI PIETRONIRO, THE MUSICIAN, AND I LOVED TO SEE HOW THE MUSIC WAS CREATED AND SHAPED ACCORDINGLY.I LOVE ARGENTO`S “PROFONDO ROSSO” SOUNDTRACK.THE BEST EVER DONE I RECKON.

The part III coming soon...

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